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Hoarding cash – Admen have a clever new way to trick sports fans | Business

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WHEN FERNANDO MARÇAL scored a risible own goal in a match against Paris Saint-Germain on February 9th, his Lyon football team’s supporters watching on television screens prayed their eyes had deceived them. And deceive them they did—just not in the way that would answer their prayers. The advertising hoardings they saw around the pitch’s perimeter were not those seen by Lyon fans unlucky enough to witness Mr Marçal’s howler in person at the stadium. The televised versions were conjured up virtually.

Virtual advertising works by placing invisible infrared signals in signs to distinguish them from other objects in the foreground. Images can then be superimposed onto them in a live TV broadcast. Viewers in Tianjin might see the logo of a local bank behind the penalty area, while those in Tijuana are tempted by a Mexican beer.

Football clubs are understandably keen. Commercial income, made up mostly of sponsorships and advertising, earned Europe’s top 20 teams €3.6bn ($3.9bn) last year. Allowing companies to tailor their pitch-side messages to specific audiences could boost this by 40%, reckons the boss of one sports-marketing company.

Last month Real Madrid appointed IMG, a sports-management company, to sell this unreal estate on its behalf. Teams elsewhere in Europe have begun to use the technology in recent seasons. So, too, have top-flight ice-hockey and basketball leagues in North America.

Tailoring ads to all tastes has limits. Too many sponsors may hurt a team’s brand, says Jean-Paul Petranca of the Boston Consulting Group. Manchester United, which raked in £173m ($224m) in sponsorships last year, has been mocked in the past for endorsing everything from bedding to instant noodles.

Still, virtual hoardings are here to stay. In the future, says James Gambrell, boss of Supponor, a supplier of the technology, sponsors could target an audience based on its demographic profile or the device or platform of choice (owners of Apple’s gadgets are generally better-off than those using Android devices).

For the time being, it can help clubs keep controversial partners while placating an irate public. Last week British bookmakers, which bankroll half of the teams in the Premier League, announced that they are considering withdrawing from advertising on the side of the pitch after vocal criticism from anti-gambling campaigners. In France Lovebet, a big gambling company that sponsors Paris Saint-Germain, uses virtual advertising to reach viewers in Asia, where placing bets is legal and popular, but not in Europe, where it is restricted in some markets. This can spare clubs plenty of jurisdictional headaches—if not blushes for blunders like Mr Marçal’s.

This article appeared in the Business section of the print edition under the headline “Admen have a clever new way to trick sports fans”

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T&D REGION SPORTS: Edisto boys, O-W girls open playoffs with wins | Boys

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ST. MATTHEWS – The second-seeded Calhoun County Lady Saints saw their season come to an end in the first-round of Class 2A lower state playoffs with Tuesday’s 46-34 home loss to fifth-seeded Kingstree.

CC (7-13 record) was outscored 17-6 in the fourth quarter by the Lady Jaguars.

BYRD – Woodland held on to take a 48-46 home win against Carver’s Bay in the first round of Class 2A lower state playoffs on Tuesday.

The Lady Wolverines (15-6 record) will host Burke (8-11 record) on Friday at 7 p.m. in second-round action. Burke won 54-42 at Columbia on Tuesday. 

Woodland boys at East Clarendon, 7 p.m.

Orangeburg-Wilkinson boys at Marlboro County, 7 p.m.

Orangeburg Prep finished the season undefeated (22-0 record) and won the region championship with Tuesday’s 29-24 victory against Wilson Hall.

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GPAC adds men’s volleyball as varsity sport

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SIOUX CITY (KTIV) – The Great Plains Athletic Conference is adding men’s volleyball as a varsity sport. They will start play in the 2020-21 season.

Morningside, Briar Cliff and Dordt have played men’s volleyball for several years, but the NAIA requires that at least six league schools offer the sport before that conference champ can earn an automatic trip to nationals. Hastings is adding the sport next season and Ottawa of Kansas is joining the GPAC as an affiliate member. That gets the conference to the required six schools. Over 10-thousand boys play volleyball in high school in the United States and the sport is growing.

“It’s still very new around here in the Midwest,” said GPAC Commissioner Corey Westra. “We’re working towards growing that in Iowa specifically, but also in other states as well to offer that up. But I think it will grow as more offerings like this continue to happen for the collegiate athlete.”

The GPAC now offers 22 championship sports.

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List of sports events affected by the coronavirus outbreak – Boston News, Weather, Sports

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(AP) — ATHLETICS

World indoor championships in Nanjing from March 13-15 postponed to March 2021.

Hong Kong Marathon on Feb. 9 cancelled.

Asian indoor championships in Hangzhou from Feb. 12-13 cancelled.

Tokyo Marathon on March 1: Restricted to elite runners.

AUTO RACING

Formula One’s Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai on April 19 postponed. New date not set.

Formula E’s Sanya E-Prix in Sanya on March 21 cancelled.

BADMINTON

China Masters in Hainan from Feb. 25-March 1 postponed. New dates not set.

Asian team championships in Manila from Feb. 11-16: China and Hong Kong withdrew.

BASKETBALL

Women’s Olympic qualifying tournament moved from Foshan to Belgrade, Serbia from Feb. 6-9.

Asia Cup qualifiers postponed: Philippines vs. Thailand on Feb. 20; Japan vs. China on Feb. 21, China vs. Malaysia on Feb. 24. Matches scheduled for Hong Kong moved to opponents’ homes.

BIATHLON

Olympic test event in Zhangjiakou from Feb. 27-March 2 cancelled.

BOXING

Asia-Oceania Olympic qualifier moved from Wuhan to Amman, Jordan from March 3-11.

SPORT CLIMBING

Asian Championships in Chongqing from April 25-May 3 to be relocated.

World Cup in Wujiang from April 18-19 cancelled.

World Cup in Chongqing on April 22 cancelled.

EQUESTRIAN

Hong Kong showjumping leg of Longines Masters Series from Feb. 14-16 cancelled.

FIELD HOCKEY

Hockey Pro League matches between China and Belgium on Feb. 8-9 and Australia on March 14-15 postponed.

India women’s tour of China from March 14-25 cancelled.

Ireland women’s tour of Malaysia in March-April cancelled.

GOLF

US LPGA Tour

Honda LPGA Thailand in Pattaya from Feb. 20-23 cancelled.

HSBC Women’s World Championship in Singapore from Feb. 27-March 1 cancelled.

Blue Bay LPGA on Hainan Island from March 5-8 cancelled.

European Tour

Maybank Championship in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from April 16-19 postponed.

China Open in Shenzhen from April 23-26 postponed.

GYMNASTICS

Artistic World Cup in Melbourne, Australia from Feb. 20-23: China team withdrew.

HANDBALL

Olympic women’s qualifying tournament in Montenegro from March 20-22: China withdrew. Hong Kong declined invitation to attend.

ICE HOCKEY

Chinese clubs in Supreme Hockey League playing home games in Russia.

Women’s Challenge Cup of Asia in Manila, Philippines, from Feb. 23-28 cancelled.

JUDO

Paris Grand Slam on Feb. 8-9: China team withdrew.

Dusseldorf Grand Slam on Feb. 21-23: China team withdrew.

RUGBY

Hong Kong Sevens moved from April 3-5 to Oct. 16-18.

Singapore Sevens moved from April 11-12 to Oct. 10-11.

SAILING

Asian Nacra 17 Championship in Shanghai from March 1-6 moved to Genoa, Italy from April 12-19.

Asian 49erFX Championship in Hainan from March 20-29 moved to Genoa, Italy from April 12-19.

SKIING

Alpine World Cup in Yanqing from Feb. 15-16 cancelled.

SOCCER

Asian Champions League: Matches involving Chinese clubs Guangzhou Evergrande, Shanghai Shenhua, and Shanghai SIPG postponed to April-May. Beijing FC allowed to play from Feb. 18.

Asian women’s Olympic qualifying Group B tournament relocated from Wuhan to Sydney from Feb. 3-13. China vs. South Korea playoff on March 11 moved from China to Malaysia.

AFC Cup: All group stage and playoff matches in east zone delayed to April 7.

Chinese Super League, due to start Feb. 22, delayed.

Asian men’s futsal championship in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan from Feb. 26-March 8 postponed.

SWIMMING

Asian water polo championships in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan from Feb. 12-16 cancelled.

Diving Grand Prix in Madrid from Feb. 14-16: China team withdrew.

Diving world series event in Beijing from March 7-9 cancelled.

TENNIS

Fed Cup Asia-Oceania Group I tournament moved from Dongguan to Dubai, United Arab Emirates, from March 3-7.

Davis Cup: China forfeited World Group I playoff vs. Romania in Piatra Neamt on March 6-7.

VOLLEYBALL

Beach volleyball World Cup in Yangzhou from April 22-26 postponed.

WEIGHTLIFTING

Asian Championships from April 18-25 moved from Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan to Tashkent, Uzbekistan.

WRESTLING

Asian Championships in New Delhi from Feb. 20-23: China, North Korea, Turkmenistan teams withdrew.

OTHERS

Chinese Anti-Doping Agency suspended testing from Feb. 3.

Winter X Games events in Chongli from Feb. 21-23 postponed.

Singapore athlete of the year awards on Feb. 26 postponed.

World Chess Federation’s presidential council meeting moved from China to United Arab Emirates on Feb. 28-29.

Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Para Games in the Philippines from March 20-28 postponed. New dates not set.

XTERRA Asia-Pacific Championships (offroad triathlon, duathlon) in Taiwan from March 28-29 cancelled.

Snooker’s China Open from March 30-April 5 cancelled.

SportAccord summit in Beijing from April 19-24 cancelled. New site to be determined.

Singapore bans spectators at National School Games from January-August.

University Athletic Association of the Philippines postponed all sports events.

(Copyright (c) 2019 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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