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Here’s Most Of The Ford Mustang-Inspired Electric SUV Before You’re Supposed To See It

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Thursday, a new teaser dropped advertising that the upcoming Ford Mustang-inspired electric SUV would debut on Nov. 17. Today, it would appear that a 3D render has leaked giving us our best idea of what to expect yet.

The 3D rendering comes courtesy of the AllCarNews Instagram account, calling the car by its long-rumored name, Mach-E, which may just be a guess, and citing “insiders” for feedback on the final design of the car.

The render’s Mustang-inspired fascia and triple-element taillights match the teasers we’ve seen for the car so far. Unfortunately, the rendering is just the shell of the car, so there’s not much else to take away from it.

Photo: Ford

Ford has previously claimed it was targeting an estimated range of 300 miles, and while it may look like a Mustang, it will be built on its own electric architecture.

While it may not be Ford’s first electric production car, it is the first product from the automaker’s $11 billion investment in shifting to EVs, and the first of 16 new Ford or Lincoln models planned to come.

It’s difficult to determine from the teasers and rendering, but the general shape is reminiscent of the Tesla Model Y, and that wouldn’t be a bad competitor to pitch an electric Ford crossover against.

We’ll learn more on Nov. 17.

Image: Ford

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Review: Philippine Airlines A321 Business Class

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For the return portion of my trip to North America I decided to book Philippine Airlines. The airline is trying to reinvent themselves, and they have new A350s with an excellent business class product.

I had flown the airline once before in 777 business class when they used to operate a New York to Vancouver flight, but was looking forward to flying them on a true long haul flight.

Suffice to say that this was a journey of highs and lows. In the next installment I’ll even be giving Philippine Airlines’ Manila Airport operation a very special award, because wow…

Booking Philippine Airlines Business Class

Philippine Airlines doesn’t belong to one of the major global alliances, though fortunately they do have reasonable paid business class fares between many markets. In particular, they seem to have excellent fares out of Taipei, which worked great for this trip.

I managed to book the following for ~1,200USD one-way, with the first segment on the A321, and the second segment on the A350-900:

01/29 PR891 Taipei to Manila departing 9:40AM arriving 12:05PM [Business]
01/29 PR118 Manila to Toronto departing 4:30PM arriving 7:00PM [Business]

While Philippine Airlines doesn’t belong to one of the global alliances, they do have a partnership with All Nippon Airways Mileage Club, so I was able to credit my miles there. However, given the reasonable paid rates, paying cash seemed to be a bette value than redeeming miles.

Philippine Airlines used to have a frequent flyer partnership with Etihad Guest, though that has been cut in the meantime.

Philippine Airlines Business Class A321 Review

My Philippine Airlines flight to Manila was departing from gate A1, at the far end of the concourse, and about a 10 minute walk from the lounge.

Philippine Airlines departure gate Taipei

The gates in Taipei are one level down from the main concourse, and the Starlux Airlines flight to Penang was boarding a couple of gates over — hah!


Philippine Airlines departure gate Taipei

My boarding pass indicated that boarding was due to start at 8:55AM, and sure enough, that’s exactly when it started. 45 minutes before departure sure is early for boarding a narrow body plane!

Philippine Airlines 891
Taipei (TPE) – Manila (MNL)
Wednesday, January 29
Depart: 9:40AM
Arrive: 12:05PM
Duration: 2hr25min
Aircraft: Airbus A321
Seat: 3K (Business Class)

At the forward door I was greeted with “mabuhays” from two friendly flight attendants, and proceeded into the business class cabin. I didn’t come into this flight with particularly high expectations, but was impressed by how fresh and well maintained the cabin felt, in spite of the plane being five years old.

Philippine Airlines has 12 business class seats on the A321, spread across three rows in a 2-2 configuration.

Philippine Airlines A321 business class


Philippine Airlines A321 business class


Philippine Airlines business class seats A321

The real estate for these seats was almost identical to what you’d find in domestic first class in the US. Seat pitch was 37″, so these seats were comfy. I assigned myself seat 3K, the window seat on the right side in the last row.


Philippine Airlines business class seats A321

I also glanced into the economy cabin — there’s no proper bulkhead or partition between business class and economy, but rather there are just curtains.

There were 187 economy seats, and the first three rows are extra legroom economy, with 34″ of pitch.

Philippine Airlines A321 economy cabin


Philippine Airlines A321 economy cabin

Anyway, back at my seat there was a manual seat recline button to the right side of the seat. The only thing that reclined was the back of the seat, as there was no footrest or anything.


Philippine Airlines business class seat recline

The tray table folded out from the far armrest, and could also be folded over in half.


Philippine Airlines business class tray table

Underneath the center armrest were two 110v outlets.


Philippine Airlines business class power outlets

There was also a USB outlet along the center console.


Philippine Airlines business class USB outlet

The Philippine Airlines A321 had individual air nozzles at each seat.


Philippine Airlines business class overhead console

Waiting at each seat upon boarding was a pillow and blanket.


Philippine Airlines business class pillow & blanket

A minute after settling in, Mario came by to introduce himself as the flight attendant who would be working business class. He offered me a pre-departure drink, with the choice of green tea, a mixed berry juice, orange juice, or water. I selected the mixed berry juice, which was tasty.

Philippine Airlines business class pre-departure drink

About 10 minutes later I was offered a menu for the flight.


Philippine Airlines business class menu

A few minutes after that I was offered a warm towel on a small tray — cute presentation!


Philippine Airlines business class warm towel

The flight was mostly full, except in business class, where only six of the seats were taken. I had a pair of seats to myself, so that certainly makes the journey even more comfortable.

About 30 minutes after boarding Mario came by to take my meal order. He asked what I wanted to drink with my meal, and if I wanted coffee or tea after the meal. He then collected the menu.

While minor, I don’t like when airlines collect the menu right after taking meal orders. That’s partly because I like to sometimes be able to reference what I’m eating, and also because there’s a drink list in the menu, and if you want to order something else it helps to be able to reference that.

At 9:30AM the main cabin door closed, at which point purser Eileen made her welcome aboard announcement. She informed us of our flight time of 1hr50min, and our cruising altitude of 34,000 feet.

During this announcement she read what I guess is Philippine Airlines’ slogan nowadays — “Philippine Airlines, the heart of the Filipino.” At this point the crew standing in the aisle bowed and held their hands over their hearts.

Okay, so that’s a cute touch, but throughout the course of my travel day on Philippine Airlines I heard that exact announcement no fewer than a dozen times, including from pilots and gate agents, with varying levels of sincerity

I get that Philippine Airlines seems really committed to this, but maybe less is more in some ways? And that’s especially true in Manila, where the slogan should be “Philippine Airlines’ Manila ground experience — the heart of Satan.”

Anyway…

At 9:35AM we began our pushback, as an AirAsia A320 pulled into the gate next to us. Around this time a manual safety demonstration was performed.

AirAsia A320 Taipei Airport

At 9:40AM we began our taxi, and at 9:45AM we were cleared for takeoff on runway 5L.

Taking off from Taipei

We had a quick takeoff roll, and five minutes after takeoff the seatbelt sign was turned off.

View after takeoff from Taipei


View after takeoff from Taipei

At this point the crew proceeded to close all the window shades in business class, which seemed unnecessary to me on a short daytime flight?

About 10 minutes after takeoff landing cards were passed out for the Philippines — goodness, that’s a lot of paperwork. I confirmed with the crew that I needed to fill this out even though I was connecting to Toronto, and they confirmed that I did.

Landing forms for the Philippines

15 minutes after takeoff the captain made his welcome aboard announcement, and informed us that we should be landing at around 11:40AM.

The meal service started about five minutes after that. The menu read as follows:

The drink list read as follows:

First tablecloths were brought out, along with drinks and a nut and wasabi snack mix. I just had a glass of still water to drink.

Philippine Airlines business class meal — snack mix and drink

35 minutes after takeoff I was presented with a meal tray. This had the appetizer, consisting of tossed kani with mustard, potato salad, and lettuce. I was also offered a selection of bread, and chose some garlic bread and a multigrain roll.


Philippine Airlines business class meal — starter & bread


Philippine Airlines business class meal — starter

About 10 minutes after that the hot main course was brought out. I chose the chicken slices in rich coco-cream curry sauce served with asparagus, red peppers, and steamed rice. Personally I thought the chicken wasn’t good at all (it was tasteless and chewy), but otherwise the dish was fine.


Philippine Airlines business class meal

Once the main course was cleared, Mario passed through the cabin with either strawberry, chocolate, or vanilla ice cream from Haagen-Dazs. I selected the vanilla ice cream.


Philippine Airlines business class meal — dessert

However, I looked at the menu at this point, and noticed the purple yam and almond milk pudding option for dessert, which I was never offered. I asked Mario about this, and he told me they were out. Oh well.

I had a cup of coffee at the conclusion of the meal.


Philippine Airlines business class meal — coffee

After the meal I checked out the lavatory at the front of the cabin, which was well maintained.


Philippine Airlines business class lavatory A321


Philippine Airlines business class lavatory amenities

I spent the rest of the flight working on my laptop. Philippine Airlines A321s don’t have personal televisions or even drop down screens, though they do have streaming entertainment, though I wasn’t able to connect with my iPhone.

At 11:05AM the captain announced that we were 120 miles from Manila, and would be landing at 11:40AM.

At 11:25AM the seatbelt sign was turned on. I opened the window shade and enjoyed the views approaching Manila, as it has probably been a decade since I’ve been to the Philippines.

View approaching Manila


View approaching Manila


View approaching Manila


View approaching Manila

We touched down in Manila at 11:35AM, and from there had a five minute taxi to our arrival gate.

Final approach to Manila

We pulled into a gate next to a Philippine Airlines’ A350. For a moment I wondered if that would be my plane to Manila. Hah, I quickly learned the joke was on me.

Philippine Airlines A350 Manila Airport

As we deplaned I had a nice view of the A321 that I just flew from Taipei.


Philippine Airlines A321 Manila Airport

Philippine Airlines Business Class Bottom Line

Overall I was impressed by Philippine Airlines’ A321 business class — the cabin felt modern, seats were comfortable, there were power ports at each business class seat, and service was friendly.

I wasn’t particularly impressed by the food, but otherwise Philippine Airlines exceeded my expectations.

If you’ve flown Philippine Airlines’ A321 business class, what was your experience like?

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Chinese restaurants are losing business over coronavirus fears

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The novel coronavirus outbreak

A medical worker rests at the isolation ward of the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital in China’s central Hubei province on Sunday, February 16.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Authorities watch as the Westerdam cruise ship approaches a port in Sihanoukville, Cambodia, on Thursday, February 13. Despite having no confirmed cases of coronavirus on board, the Westerdam was refused port by four other Asian countries before being allowed to dock in Cambodia.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A worker has his temperature checked on a shuttered commercial street in Beijing on February 12.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Beds are made in the Wuhan Sports Center, which has been converted into a temporary hospital in Wuhan, China.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A child rides a scooter past a police officer wearing protective gear outside the Hong Mei House in Hong Kong on February 11. More than 100 people evacuated the housing block after four residents in two different apartments tested positive for the coronavirus.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A police officer, left, wears protective gear as he guards a cordon at the Hong Mei House in Hong Kong on February 11.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Chinese President Xi Jinping has his temperature checked during an appearance in Beijing on February 10.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

People participating in a Lunar New Year Parade in New York City hold signs reading, “Wuhan stay strong!” on February 9.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A worker wearing a protective suit uses a machine to disinfect a business establishment in Shanghai, China, on February 9.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Workers in protective gear walk near the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama on February 7.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A woman grieves while paying tribute to Li at Li’s hospital in Wuhan on February 7.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The Anthem of the Seas cruise ship is seen docked at the Cape Liberty Cruise Port in Bayonne, New Jersey, on February 7. Passengers were to be screened for coronavirus as a precaution, an official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told CNN.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A light installation is displayed by striking members of the Hospital Authority Employees Alliance and other activists at the Hospital Authority building in Hong Kong on February 7.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Passengers are seen on the deck of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, docked at the Yokohama Port on February 7.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Flight attendants wearing face masks make their way through Don Mueang Airport in Bangkok, Thailand, on February 7.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Workers check sterile medical gloves at a latex-product manufacturer in Nanjing, China, on February 6.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A woman wears a protective mask as she shops in a Beijing market on February 6.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

This aerial photo shows the Leishenshan Hospital that is being built in Wuhan, China, to handle coronavirus patients.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A passenger shows a note from the World Dream cruise ship docked at the Kai Tak cruise terminal in Hong Kong on February 5.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A mask is seen on a statue in Beijing on February 5.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A dog in Beijing wears a makeshift mask constructed from a paper cup.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Striking hospital workers in Hong Kong demand the closure of the border with mainland China on February 4.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The Diamond Princess cruise ship sits anchored in quarantine off the port of Yokohama, Japan, on February 4. It arrived a day earlier with passengers feeling ill.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A medical worker wearing protective gear waits to take the temperature of people entering Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong Kong on February 4.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Medical workers in protective suits help transfer patients to a newly completed field hospital in Wuhan.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

People wearing protective overalls talk outside a Wuhan hotel housing people in isolation on February 3.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A man stands in front of TV screens broadcasting a speech by Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on February 3. Lam said the city would shut almost all border-control points to the mainland.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A colleague sprays disinfectant on a doctor in Wuhan on February 3.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Medical workers move a coronavirus patient into an isolation ward at the Second People’s Hospital in Fuyang, China, on February 1.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Children wear plastic bottles as makeshift masks while waiting to check in to a flight at the Beijing Capital Airport on January 30.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Passengers in Hong Kong wear protective masks as they wait to board a train at Lo Wu Station, near the mainland border, on January 30.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A volunteer wearing protective clothing disinfects a street in Qingdao, China, on January 29.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Nanning residents line up to buy face masks from a medical appliance store on January 29.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Lyu Jun, left, a member of a medical team leaving for Wuhan, says goodbye to a loved one in Urumqi, China, on Tuesday, January 28.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A charter flight from Wuhan arrives at an airport in Anchorage, Alaska, on January 28. The US government chartered the plane to bring home US citizens and diplomats from the American consulate in Wuhan.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

South Korean President Moon Jae-in wears a mask to inspect the National Medical Center in Seoul on January 28.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, attends a news conference in Hong Kong on January 28. Lam said China will stop individual travelers to Hong Kong while closing some border checkpoints and restricting flights and train services from the mainland.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Workers at an airport in Novosibirsk, Russia, check the temperatures of passengers who arrived from Beijing on January 28.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Alex Azar, the US Secretary of Health and Human Services, speaks during a news conference about the American public-health response.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Two residents walk in an empty park in Wuhan on Monday, January 27. The city remained on lockdown for a fourth day.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A person wears a protective mask, goggles and coat as he stands in a nearly empty street in Beijing on Sunday, January 26.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Medical staff members bring a patient to the Wuhan Red Cross Hospital on Saturday, January 25.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

People wear protective masks as they walk under Lunar New Year decorations in Beijing on January 25.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Construction workers in Wuhan begin to work on a special hospital to deal with the outbreak on Friday, January 24.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A couple kisses goodbye as they travel for the Lunar New Year holiday in Beijing on January 24.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Workers manufacture protective face masks at a factory in China’s Hubei Province on Thursday, January 23.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Shoppers wear masks in a Wuhan market on January 23.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Passengers are checked by a thermography device at an airport in Osaka, Japan, on January 23.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

People wear masks while shopping for vegetables in Wuhan on January 23.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A militia member checks the body temperature of a driver in Wuhan on January 23.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Passengers wear masks as they arrive at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, Philippines, on January 23.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A customer holds boxes of particulate respirators at a pharmacy in Hong Kong on January 23.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Passengers wear masks at the high-speed train station in Hong Kong on January 23.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

A woman rides an electric bicycle in Wuhan on Wednesday, January 22.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

People in Guangzhou, China, wear protective masks on January 22.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

People go through a checkpoint in Guangzhou on January 22.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Medical staff of Wuhan’s Union Hospital attend a gathering on January 22.

The novel coronavirus outbreak

Health officials hold a news conference in Beijing on January 22.

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New Mexico rules for security at marijuana businesses less strict than other states

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In September 2019, a masked gunman walked right through the front door of an Albuquerque medical marijuana dispensary called Everest Apothecary.

One employee called 911 to report the business had been robbed at gunpoint with workers and patients inside.

“He ran in and had me put everything in the bag and then he had everyone get down on their knees,” the employee told the operator. “He didn’t take any money he just took the cannabis.”

Surveillance video shows the masked gunman take off with the help of a getaway driver. The suspect got away with about $5,000 worth of medical grade marijuana.

GROW HOUSE HEIST 

In May 2019, police were called in the middle of the night to a medical marijuana cultivation facility which is overseen by Reynold Greenleaf and Associates.

Officer lapel camera footage shows K9 officers scouring the facility. However, police say at least three crooks got away after snagging a handful of marijuana plants and damaging a few others.

EXPENSIVE PRODUCT STOLEN

In February 2019, someone shattered window to Cannabis Good in northeast Albuquerque and stole roughly $46,000 worth of marijuana products.

According to police records, while there were security cameras at the dispensary, a system upgrade had recently been completed and “it was possible the system was not re-set to record footage.”

STATE OVERSIGHT

We took our findings to Dominick Zurlo who is the director of the state’s medical cannabis program to ask him about the crimes reported to the agency.

Zurlo: “I would describe it as minimal.”

4 Investigator Nathan O’Neal: But there have been some serious incidents involving armed robberies where there were patients and workers held at gunpoint – how do you react to hearing about those types of incidents?

Zurlo: “I don’t think my reaction is any different than if I heard that occur in any other store or restaurant or any other location, it’s the same sort of situation.”

Currently the entire medical cannabis industry is regulated by the New Mexico Department of Health, which only has two broad rules when it comes to security.

“They are required to have a security plan and to have a security system in place,” said Zurlo.

New Mexico has a much more relaxed approach to security requirements compared to some states with robust medical or recreational programs.

For example, in Nevada the security requirements are exhaustive – from camera placement and lighting to backup security systems and training for security staff.

4 Investigator Nathan O’Neal: Some states require reinforced walls for the safe room, they require guards whether they be armed or not – are there any such requirements in New Mexico?

Zurlo: “We do require the product be locked up in a safe overnight… with regards to the rest of that, depending on the location that they have, the needs can be different for each location which is why we recommend and why we require them… to be able to show that they have a security plan so they can show that patients are safe, product is safe and their staff are safe.”

LACK OF COMMUNICATION?

Some leaders in the cannabis industry in New Mexico believe the health department should do more to help prevent potential crime which could include sending out an alert and photos of potential suspects when a crime targeting a cannabis business happens.

In a series of emails, William Ford of the consulting group Reynold Greenleaf and Associates wrote the health department expressing concerns.

“This information could be instrumental in helping us protect our employees and patients, and it seems irresponsible for the [state] not to provide as much information as possible,” said Ford in an internal email.

However, medical cannabis program director Zurlo told 4 Investigates that those types of communications are not the responsibility of the health department.

“We have no issues with the producers and the distributors talking about that with themselves – where we see that is, that’s a breakdown in communication among the community of the producers,” said Zurlo.

RECREATIONAL LEGALIZATION STALLS

While efforts at the Roundhouse to legalize recreational pot in New Mexico have stalled for now, there’s still an appetite to take what’s worked in other states to ensure safety at both grow operations and retail dispensaries.

“This is about ensuring that if you’re opening up a dispensary in your community, you’re also ensuring someone can’t break in take that product and put it back out on the market – and you’re keeping your employees and patients safe,” said Pat Davis who was chairman of the governor’s marijuana legalization work group.

“Maybe alerts to the industry, for example — that’s another good argument for legalization is that as we put this into a pro-industry department, we can expect some of those cool tools from other states,” said Davis.

However, for now, security will largely be left up to each individual business with little direction from the state. No changes in security may mean medical marijuana companies may deal with more problems with crime.

We reached out to several medical marijuana businesses including ones highlighted in this report. None of them responded to our requests for an interview.

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